Check your privilege, sugar-tits

You can’t blame Adria Richardson’s lunatic hyper-entitlement on modern feminism. It wasn’t Betty Friedan or Simone de Beauvoir who came up with the idea that one (1) woman has a perfect right to walk into a conference center full of men, meeting to discuss a field built and maintained by men in a male culture, and police everything every one of those men says and does. It’s not a recent idea. It’s an eighteenth-century[1] upper-class English idea: After dinner, the ladies would retire to another room, and the gentlemen would drink port and talk man talk (in France, the ladies did not leave the table, incidentally). That sort of thing. Affluent Victorians exaggerated it to a baroque absurdity, and drove it down-market to the rest of society. It never fully penetrated the working class; it’s a class marker to this day, in the English-speaking world. That would be why our modern progressives are so devoted to guarding the ladies’ delicate ears from coarse masculine ejaculations.

The French always said English ladies were frigid stiffs.

Anyhow: The point is, I don’t mind much that men welcome women into male spaces like tech conferences far more readily than women will ever welcome men into female spaces (“what’s mine is mine, what’s yours is ours” — Eve). They just need to accept that these are our spaces, we created them, and we must know what we’re doing because ALL of the spaces actually worth entering into just happen to have been created by men. So maybe they could try to control the raging privilege in their girly little hearts and show some respect for immensely valuable institutions that were built and maintained for decades entirely without the kind of input they bring to the table. But that’s the problem: You can’t get that concept past the female solipsism filter. Adria Richardson thinks the tech industry exists for her benefit. She is incapable of conceptualizing any other reason for it to exist. She is incapable of focusing her eyes on a picture that isn’t a portrait of herself.

 

[1] Or seventeenth? Dunno: The Elizabethans were pretty coarse, and the Cromwell crowd weren’t as far as I recall an upper class phenomenon. Did this crap spread both up and down from the merchant classes? What about Germanic proddies on the Continent? It’s an interesting question.

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